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Suspect vat refund email

Anonymous
Not applicable
Today I receved an email saying "In response to an increase in VAT in the EU and currency changes, and as a result of last week's VAT-related price change, it has come to our attention that between Oct 2012 and Oct 2014 there was a system error which resulted in some of our customers paying the incorrect rate of VAT on some services.

This email had all my personal information, but asked me to follow a link to log into my account, has anyone else seen an email like this? The email looked legitimate, if anyone from O2 monitors this thread, please let me know how to report this.
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viridis
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Agreed @MI5 with my experience of loggers, this is too far fetched and slow to be an end users pc logging keystrokes.
The target is too small, risk too high, job too slow.



Anonymous
Not applicable
And let's face it @MI5 IF the issue was on domestic pc's then heaven knows how many SUCCESSFUL scams would be being reported all across the country.

No this is o2 specific and demands action and NOW.

Anonymous
Not applicable
So. Some advice if you don't mind. These guys have my full name and title, date of birth and email address. They also have my phone number, type, contract details, IMEI and PUK code. Nice.

Should I get rid of the email? What can they do with the phone information? Can they use it to make calls with another phone on my account? Maybe I'm paranoid but I don't know what people can do with this level of detail.

MI5
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They can do lots with it but what they are after is your bank details so they can empty your bank account.
They aren't interested in your O2 account it's just a way to get what they really want from you.
I have no affiliation whatsoever with O2 or any subsidiary companies. Comments posted are entirely of my own opinion. This is not Customer Service so we are unable to help with account specific issues.

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OnePlus 6 (O2 & Sfr), Z3 Tablet (Three UK), iPhone 8+ (EE)

Cleoriff
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@MI5 wrote:
They can do lots with it but what they are after is your bank details so they can empty your bank account.
They aren't interested in your O2 account it's just a way to get what they really want from you.

So is contacting your bank and asking them to be vigilant in case of a scam ...the way to go then?

Obviously the OP would be checking but it could be too late unless he has forewarned the bank...?

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MI5
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Bank should be made aware but any decent bank would prevent the transfer of large funds to foreign bank accounts anyway.
I have no affiliation whatsoever with O2 or any subsidiary companies. Comments posted are entirely of my own opinion. This is not Customer Service so we are unable to help with account specific issues.

Currently using:
OnePlus 6 (O2 & Sfr), Z3 Tablet (Three UK), iPhone 8+ (EE)

Anonymous
Not applicable
I too felt the same lack of interest .... not helpful!

Anonymous
Not applicable

@Anonymous wrote:
So. Some advice if you don't mind. These guys have my full name and title, date of birth and email address. They also have my phone number, type, contract details, IMEI and PUK code. Nice.

Should I get rid of the email? What can they do with the phone information? Can they use it to make calls with another phone on my account? Maybe I'm paranoid but I don't know what people can do with this level of detail.

Definitely NOT get rid of the email. I would print a hard copy then delete it. 

 

In the meantime I would use a different pc, perhaps one at your work if you have a good IT system, and change ALL of your passwords. I would then follow the advice above about cleaning your pc before using it again. 

 

At this point it is probably nothing but to avoid risk. 

Anonymous
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All I can say is ...... yep, ditto

Cleoriff
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@MI5 wrote:
Bank should be made aware but any decent bank would prevent the transfer of large funds to foreign bank accounts anyway.

Indeed...and mine is excellent but the scammers may do it in smaller amounts. I had three separate hacks within 14hrs on mine. Took a total of £1400 out. Last one stopped (and all refunded) but I personally would look for some extra vigilance from my bank

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